Allergy Patches

Allergy patch testing ~ what’s all that about then?

Hopefully this blog will help you understand the process should you find yourself having to undergo it yourself.

On Friday morning I took a trip with my husband who is my chief supporter and driver. My appointment was with the Dermatological department to have 41 allergy test patches applied; 39 to my back and 2 onto my arm (as these are thought to be prime culprits and may need ripping off before my return visit).

I was given directions on how to “care” for my patches until my return on the Tuesday morning.

The patches had to stay on for the duration of the bank holiday weekend ~ to be removed by my husband on the Monday evening.  I then had to go to see the Consultant on the Tuesday morning (today) to read the results.

From the application of the patches until the reading on the Tuesday morning I was instructed to: ~

  • Keep the patches and my back dry throughout the entire testing period, no showers and only washes ~ or shallow baths (but not really advised due to steam), until after the doctors review. Emphasising even after removal of the patches on the Sunday evening I still had to ensure not to get any moisture to my back at all.
  • To keep the patches in place using extra tape if needed. Dave was to check periodically for me and press them down adding more tape if he felt they were looking a little loose.
  • If any patches fell off to immediately photograph the area, record time and date they fell off and the number of patches that fell off too.
  • To wear a close fitting t~shirt or vest to help prevent the patches being disturbed.
  • To wear dark coloured older tops as some of the substances were oil based and may seep onto and stain clothing.
  • To have Dave remove the patches on Sunday evening. Photograph my back and write down the time taken down and photographed.
  • Once patches have been removed to ensure all pen markings remained visible.
    Also not to:
  • Do any sporting activities (ha ha), heavy lifting or stretching, excessive movement or sweating ~ basically not to do anything that could cause the patches to move.
  • Scratch ~ if the itch became unbearable to go to nearest out of hours doctor.

So here I am with my patches in place…

IMG_8424IMG_8427

Here is the list of allergens they are testing for..

Scan_20180504

Now if you are like me and the above allergens mean absolutely nothing to you I have numbered them and listed a brief explanation of what they are and where they would be found at the bottom of this blog post.

This weekend has been beautiful, a really sunny, blue skied, bbq weekend ~ except I am hiding indoors to avoid the sun and getting hot because any sweating can cause the patches to become unstuck ~ buggerit!

One thing I can say is my back is alive with little imps creating havoc making my skin under the patches itch like a muddyfunster. It’s not great, to say the least ~ although I am not begrudging everyone enjoying themselves have fun outside ~ I’m sure *crosses fingers* we will have more sunshine to come.

One top tip I will share with you is that slapping an itch helps to relieve it ~ my middle daughter very kindly slapped me, as did my husband, whenever I needed relief.

So, *inserts drum roll* to the results..

The patches are off  and it is such a relief but my skin is now both sore and extremely itchy ~ not sure which is worse, the patch reactions or the reaction to the tape holding them on!

Photos of patch free back and arm, plus reactive arms (chest too but not sharing my cleavage photo):~

31543511_10156344499819555_7603108517930598400_n
Left arm
32145411_10156344499859555_4721251926933504000_n
Right arm
arm
Arm with one reaction
full back
Full back view ~ the tape reaction feels like sunburn
left side of back
Left side of back ~ two reactions
right side of back
Right side of back ~ two reactions

SO, what did I react to? Here goes..
I am officially allergic to, in numerical order from the allergy test list;
5)   Cobalt (11) Chloride
11) IPPD Black Rubber Mix
17) Fragrance Mix 1 (Parfum)
19) Nickel Sulphate
38) Fragrance Mix 11
39) Lyral

The lovely nurse at the hospital could see my discomfort and liberally applied a high dose steroid cream to my back and arm. Hopefully it will work it’s magic soon to relieve the pain/itching.

Rather than write out what is on the advice sheets I have scanned them for you so that if you are interested you can see what I have to now do (lots of going through house cupboards and toiletries to remove all offending objects and replace with “safe” ones).

Fragrance Mix I & II p1Fragrance Mix I & II p2

Cobalt

Hydroxyisohexyl 3~cyclohexene carboxaldehydeIPPDNickel

So that’s that as they say ~ I have a joint clinic appointment on Friday 25th May with both Rheumatology and Dermatology Clinics but have a feeling that now it will be a case of not much more they can do for me. I haven’t got Lupus so the diagnosis via Rheumatology will be Hypermobility with other unknown autoimmune disorder. I have Myalgic Encephalomyelitis which no doubt has been exacerbated by my allergies ~ I don’t think dermatology clinic will be able to do anything further either. I am thinking it will be a tie it up and discharge appointment. So back to self~care and GP for any steroids if ever need them again and pain relief.

As promised earlier I have gone down the allergen list with a brief description of what they are, just in case any of you are interested..

  1.  Potassium Dichromate ~ this substance is found in leather among other things.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  2. Neomycin ~ is an antibacterial that is used widely in topical creams, ointments, lotions, eye preparations and eardrops. It is also commonly found in combination preparations with other antibacterials and corticosteroids. These prescription and non-prescription preparations are used to treat a variety of skin, eye and external ear disorders that have become infected and inflamed. Neomycin tablets taken orally may be used to suppress gastrointestinal bacteria before surgery to avoid infection. It is also used as a preservative in some vaccines.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  3. Thiuram Mix ~ a mix of 3 chemicals which are used as additives in manufacturing rubber products, such as gloves, elastic bands and kitchen utensils. Many everyday objects, clothes and footwear contain Thiuram Mix. This test is essentially looking for a latex allergy.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  4. P-Phenylenediamine (PPD) ~ is a chemical substance that is widely used as a permanent hair dye. It may also been found in textile or fur dyes, dark coloured cosmetics, temporary tattoos, photographic developer and lithography plates, photocopying and printing inks, black rubber, oils, greases and gasoline.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  5. Cobalt (11) Chloride ~ is a metal used with other metals to make metal alloys. This substance can be found in spray paints, enamels, wood stains and paints, as well as bricks and cement and metal tools. It is also commonly found in keys, jewellery and orthopaedic and dental implants. Because cobalt and nickel can be found in many of the same metal products, allergies to both metals can develop.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  6. Caine Mix 111 ~ This mix is made up of 3 chemicals used as local or topical anaesthetic agents.  If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  7. Formaldehyde (liquid) ~ Formaldehyde resins provide the unique qualities of many types of modern day fabrics, for example anti~cling, anti~static, waterproof etc. If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  8. Colophonium (Rosin) (Colophony) ~ is the sap or sticky substance that comes from pine and spruce trees. Its “stickiness” lends itself to being used in a wide range of products. Examples are some cosmetics, adhesives, medicines, toiletries, household items, recreational items, chewing gum, firewood, paper products, cements and putties, floor coverings and tiles, printing inks, saw dusts and pine resin, asphalt products, soldering products, corrosion inhibitors, grease and lubricant thickener, topical dentistry medications, veterinary medications, waterproof agents and industry machine belts!
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  9. Clioquinlo (Quinolone Mix) ~  a group of synthetic antibacterial agents that may be used in combination with corticosteroids to treat skin infections such as eczema, athlete’s foot, jock itch and ringworm. It may also be used as an anti-infective, anti-fungal and anti-bacterial agents to treat gastrointestinal and vaginal infections.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  10. Balsam of Peru ~ is a sticky aromatic liquid that comes from cutting the bark of the tree Myroxolon balsamum. It is not only used for its aromatic and fixative (i.e. delays evaporation) properties but also for its mild antiseptic, antifungal and antiparasitic attributes. It has 3 main uses: fragrance in perfumes and toiletries; flavouring in food and drink; healing properties in medicinal products.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  11. IPPD Black Rubber Mix ~ Black rubber mix or its components is used to make black or dark grey rubber products such as shoes, tires, goggles, and sporting equipment.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  12. Lanolin Alcohol (Wool Alcohols) ~ Wool alcohols (or lanolin) are a natural product obtained from the fleece of sheep and are commonly used in cosmetics, toiletries and medicines.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  13. Mercapto Mix ~ Allergic reactions to rubber can be due to allergy to natural latex sap or to one of the many chemicals used in the manufacturing of rubber.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  14. Epoxy Resin ~ these resin systems are used widely in industry because of their strong adhesive properties, chemical resistance and toughness.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  15. Parabens Mix ~ Parabens are used as preservatives in many over-the-counter medications, cosmetics, and personal care and hygiene products.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  16. PTBPF Resin (4-Tert Butyphenol Formaldehyde) ~ is a phenol-formaldehyde resin that is mainly used in adhesives. It is ideally suited for this because it has very good binding qualities and has a particular tackiness for the surfaces of leather and rubber. It’s principally found in glued leather goods such as shoes, handbags, belts and watchstraps. Other sources include, DIY glues, varnish and lacquer resins, motor oil additives, rubber antioxidants, printing inks, fibreglass products, plywood, masonry sealant, insecticides, and deodorants and commercial disinfectants.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  17. Fragrance Mix (Parfum) ~ is a mixture of 8 individual fragrances that is used to screen for fragrance allergy. They are found in numerous toiletries and skin care products. Some industrial products, such as metalworking fluids, may also contain fragrances. Fragrances occur naturally in some foods and spices. Cinnamon, citrus and clove contain fragrance chemicals.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  18. Quaternium 15 (Dowicil 200) ~ is a preservative found in numerous cosmetics and medicated creams. It is also sometimes also used in cooling fluids.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  19. Nickel Sulphate ~ is one of the most common causes of contact allergic dermatitis. In affected individuals, dermatitis (also called eczema) develops in places where nickel-containing metal is touching the skin.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  20. Kathon CG Cl + ME -Isothiazilonone (liquid) ~ this is used together as a preservative in cosmetics, pharmaceutical and self~hygiene products, household and commercial industrial products.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  21. Mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) ~ You are most likely to contact this when using, wearing, or handling natural or synthetic rubber products at work or at home. Such as work shoes and athletic shoes,  also as anti-corrosion agent in cooling oils, drilling and cutting oils, antifreeze, and fungicides.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  22. Amerchol L101 ~ is a trade name of products containing lanolin. It is found in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, topical drugs, furniture polish, leather, metal corrosion prevention products, paper, inks, textiles, furs, cutting oils, and waxes.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  23. Sesquiterpine Lactone Mix ~ are present in the oleoresin fraction of leaf, stem, flower and possibly in the pollen. Allergy can be due to direct contact with the plant, with its pollen, or to skin care products that use the plant extracts.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  24. Chlorocresol 4-Choro-3-Cresol ~ is used as a disinfectant and preservative found in creams, shampoos, antiseptics, disinfectants, and fungicides.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  25. 2-Bromo-2-Nitropropane-1, 3-Diol (Bronopol) ~ is used as a bactericide, in antiseptics and as a preservative in cosmetics.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  26. Cetylstearyl Alcohol ~ is used as an emulsifier and emollient in cosmetic lotions, creams, ointments and pharmaceutical preparations.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  27. Fucin (Fusdic Acid) ~ is an antibiotic agent used in used in treatment or prevention of bacterial infections. Often found in treatments for leg ulcers, cutaneous infections and other kinds of bacterial infections.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  28. Tixocortol-21-Pivalate ~ is an anti-inflammatory topical corticosteroid used in the treatment of rhinitis (as a nasal suspension or aerosols), pharyngitis (as lozenges), ulcerative colitis (as enema or rectal solution), and oral, inflammatory conditions (as a suspension or a powder). It is also the principle screening substance for contact allergies to class A steroids.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  29. Budesonide ~ is a potent corticosteroid and anti-inflammatory agent that is most commonly used topically to treat skin disease. Budesonide may be found in medications used to treat asthma, noninfectious rhinitis (including hay fever and other allergies), and nasal polyposis.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  30. Imidazolidinyl Urea ~ is a formaldehyde-releasing preservative. It is used in many cosmetics and pharmaceutical preparations.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  31. Compositae Mix ~ consists of extracts specific plants from the compositae or Astraceae family. Extracts of these plants may be found in cosmetics and skin care products and hair care products, anti-inflammatory medications, ointments and tinctures, mouth washes, and herbal lozenges.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  32. Diazolidinyl-Urea ~ is a formaldehyde-releasing preservative. It is used in many cosmetics and pharmaceutical preparations.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  33. Methyldibromoglutronitrile ~ is a preservative that has been used in cosmetic and toiletry preparations as well as in some industrial products.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  34. Ethylenediamine Dihydrochdoride ~ is a substance that is used to manufacture various drugs and industrial compounds. It is used as a preservative, emulsifier and stabilizer in certain medical creams, cosmetics and a variety of other products.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  35. Chloroxylenol (PCMX) ~ is used as a preservative in cooling fluids, cosmetics, topical medications, urinary antiseptics and metal working fluids. Liquids are used for cleaning and disinfecting wounds, abrasions and abscesses. The creams are used for cuts, scratches, insect bites, burns and similar problems. Powders are used to treat problems of the feet and skin inflammations. It is also found in hair conditioners, toilet and deodorants, soaps and paste.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  36. Carba Mix ~ contains three allergens used as fungicides and pesticides and also in the manufacture of many rubber products.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  37. Disperse Blue Mix 106/124 ~ is a dye used in textiles. It is also sometimes used in other products such as diapers and seatbelts.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  38. Fragrance Mix 11 ~ can be found in most products, especially cosmetics, as they are used to add scent or flavour, commonly used in perfumes, cosmetics, laundry detergents and personal hygiene products.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  39. Lyral ~ is a fragrance known for it’s soft delicate floral, lily, cyclamen note. It is used in products such as alcoholic lotion, anti perspirant, deodorant, detergent perborate, fabric softener, hard surface cleaner, shampoo and soap.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  40. Sodium Metabisulfite ~ is used as a food additive, mainly as a preservative and is sometimes identified as E223. It is not recommended for consumption by children. It is present in many dilutable squashes. It is commonly used in home brewing preparations to sanitize equipment. It is used as a cleaning agent for potable water reverse osmosis membranes in desalination systems. It is also used to remove chloramine from drinking water after treatment.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.
  41. Methylisothiazolinone ~ is a preservative. It was initially used occupationally, in paints, adhesive/glues and cleaners etc. Since 2005, it has been widely used in cosmetics and household products, such as moist wipes, shampoos, cleaners and liquid laundry products.
    If you click on the link here you can read up more about it.

x~X~x

Author: crazypurplemama

Adore all things purple, wife, mother, amateur photographer, dog lover & Blogger.

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